Do I Have To Sign An Arbitration Agreement

In the vast majority of cases, an electronic or digital signature will have as much strength and impact as an original signature. While there may be situations where digital signature is not an option, these circumstances are rare. As a general rule, an arbitration agreement is presented at the time they are recruited (either as part of a longer employment contract or as a separate document). But sometimes a company decides to ask current employees to sign an agreement. In both cases, one often wonders: do I have to sign the agreement? If signing an employment contract is a condition of employment, whether you are a member of the company or you are already a worker, you must sign it if you want to have a job. Under California law and any other state`s law, an employer may refuse to hire (or fire you) if you refuse to accept all of your labor disputes. You have the right to have a lawyer review each contract before signing, including a staff arbitration agreement. If your employer has required you to sign one, tell your employer that you want a copy so you can have it checked by a lawyer before you sign. Each business should have a registered agent and, in many cases, it is prescribed by law.

Most arbitration decisions are binding, which means that as soon as the arbitrator makes a decision, you cannot appeal and ask that your case be retried, either by another arbitrator or by the courts. However, if you are a worker who has signed an arbitration agreement with your employer and feels discriminated against, the arbitration agreement does not deprive you of the right to go to a government agency such as the Equal Employment Commission (EEOC). The filing of a discrimination complaint opens an investigation by the EEOC and, depending on the results, the Agency may bring an action on your behalf. At the same time, California law requires that an arbitration agreement contain certain conditions to be applicable. For example, the employer must pay all arbitration costs, including fees for arbitrators that can easily be tens of thousands of dollars. And an arbitration agreement cannot limit an employee`s rights to “discovery” or damages that can be recovered. In addition, in recent years, state and federal courts in California have refused to impose provisions in arbitration agreements that prevent employees from filing a class action.